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wifi panel antenna comparison

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  • wifi panel antenna comparison

    whats the difference between this http://www.radiolabs.com/products/an...flat-panel.php and yours http://www.rfwel.com/shop/?target=pr...&cat=77&page=1.

  • #2
    The link you provided has two antennas one has 13dBi of gain and the other has 19dBi of gain. The antenna you link from our site has 18dBi of gain which is higher than the 13dBi but lower than the 19dBi. Here is a link to a 19dBi antenna on our site: http://www.rfwel.com/shop/?target=pr...roduct_id=1302. Another difference is the beamwidth which matters to you depending on application. Here is a very quick glance at antenna spec’s to allow you to compare different antennas:

    1) Gain – this is in dBi (or decibels relative to an isotropic antenna) – usually the higher the gain the better since this gives you a stronger signal and helps overcome cable losses.

    IMPORTANT thing to remember is that dBi is a logarithmic scale (10xlog(gain)) which means a small dBi difference can be quite big. However sometimes too strong a signal is not necessarily the best due to potential interference to other device or interference from other devices (since you are now able to pick up interferers from a more distant location) and due to FCC regulatory limits on amount of emission as well as to to constraints on the hardware (many radios have a maximum input power they can tolerate without bad things happening).

    2) Beamwidth – simply this is the angle the radiation covers and show how directional antenna is. A large beamwidth means an antenna can cover a larger area which is good if you dont know where your mobile device will be or bad since now you can pick up interferes from other directions.

    3) Front to back ratio – is the ratio of the power in the main beam to the sidelobes. You want this to be larger since you want to focus most of your beam in the main lobe.

    4) VSWR – this is the ratio of forward power to reflected power (similar to return loss).

    Other than that look at connector type (avoids using couplers which degrade signal), wind loading (depending on where you will mount it), maximum input power etc.

    Here are other 2.4GHz antennas: http://www.rfwel.com/shop/home.php?cat=77

    Let me know if you have additional questions or require further clarification.

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